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President Ronald Reagan's Mother's Day Proclamations

Ronald Reagan

 
"The arms of a mother are the newborn's first cradle and the injured child's first refuge. The hands of a mother are the hands of care for the child who is near and of prayer for the one who is far away. The eyes of a mother are the eyes of fond surprise at baby's first step, the eyes of unspoken worry at the young adult's first voyage from home, the eyes of gladness at every call or visit that says she is honored and remembered. The heart of a mother is a heart that is always full." -Ronald Reagan, Mothers Day Proclamation 1988

 

 

Ronald Reagan- Mothers Day Proclamation 1981

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation
Each year our Nation designates Mother's Day as a moment of special tribute and appreciation for the mothers of America.
Recent years have brought many changes to the lives of American mothers. Today they are increasingly involved in business, politics, education, arts, sciences, and government as well as the vital work of .the home and family. Yet, whether they seek careers outside the home or work as homemakers, they remain the heart of the American family.
They shape the character of our people through the love and nurture of their children. It is the strength they give their families that keeps our Nation strong.
On this Mother's Day, we express our deep personal gratitude to our own mothers and thank all those women whose devotion to their families helps sustain a healthy and productive citizenry.
Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Sunday, May 10, 1981, as Mother's Day. I direct Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal Government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.
In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirteenth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred eightyone, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fifth.
RONALD REAGAN
[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:44 p.m., April 13, 1981]

Ronald Reagan- Mothers Day Proclamation 1982

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation
Each year this Nation designates the second Sunday in May as Mother's Day-a day on which to recognize and honor mothers for the roles they play in our families and society.
In recent years, the shape of family life has been changing. Increasing numbers of mothers have added outside paid employment to their traditional roles, and, similarly, fathers in increasing numbers are sharing home responsibilities with them.
Mothers nourish and support bodies, minds and Souls; encourage good health; nurse illness; overcome discouragement and cheer success. They create and sustain an atmosphere that helps children and families thrive.
Mother's Day gives all of us an opportunity to thank our own mothers for their devotion and to acknowledge that every mother is essential to her family-the social unit on which our society is built.
Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 9, 1982, be observed as Mother's Day. I direct government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.
In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 5th day of April in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixth.
RONALD REAGAN
[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:33 p.m., April 5, 1982]

Ronald Reagan- Mothers Day Proclamation 1983

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation
Traditionally, this Nation honors its mothers by designating the second Sunday in May as Mother's Day.
To our mothers we owe our highest esteem, for it is from their gift of life that the flow of events begins that shapes our destiny. A mother's love, nurturing, and beliefs are among the strongest influences molding the development and character of our youngsters. As Henry Ward Beecher wrote, "What a mother sings to the cradle goes all the way down to the coffin."
Motherhood is both a great responsibility and one of the most rewarding and pleasurable experiences life has to offer. Mother's Day presents a special opportunity to appreciate our mothers-to consider all they have done, and all they continue to do, in fostering children's physical and emotional growth, nursing illness, encouraging success, easing failure, maintaining family life, supporting their spouses, contributing vitally to the economy through their accomplishments at work, and serving their communities. The quality and scope of their activities, as well as their overriding concern for the well-being of their families and our country, inspires and strengthens us as individuals and as a Nation.
Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 8, 1983, be observed as Mother's Day. I direct Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal Government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.
In Witness Whereof I have hereunto set my hand this 6th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.
RONALD REAGAN
[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:34 a.m., April 7, 1983]

Ronald Reagan- Mothers Day Proclamation 1984

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation
By tradition, the second Sunday in May is designated as Mother's Day, a day on which we honor and think about our mothers.
Almost every woman in our Nation looks forward to the rewards and joys of motherhood without overlooking the long-term effort that raising children demands. We are grateful to mothers for their willingness to give of themselves for their children's well-being, for their wholehearted belief in their offspring, for their love, for being wellsprings of hope, and for all the support they lend to us throughout life.
Motherhood is both a great responsibility and one of the most unique, rewarding, and pleasurable experiences life has to offer. Just as the family is the basis of a strong nation, so dedicated mothers are frequently the key to strong families. The quality and scope of their activities, as well as their overriding concern for the well-being of their families and the future of our country, inspire and strengthen us as individuals and as a Nation.
In recognition of the contributions of all mothers to their families and to the Nation, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), designated the second Sunday in May each year as Mother's Day and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.
Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 13, 1984, be observed as Mother's Day. I direct Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.
In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 3rd day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eightyfour, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.
RONALD REAGAN
[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:46 p.m., April 3, 1984]

Ronald Reagan- Mothers Day Proclamation 1985

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation
For most of this century, we have set aside the second Sunday in May as a special day when we honor our mothers. It is very appropriate that we do so because from the earliest days of our country, mothers have played a major role in building America into a great Nation. The fortitude, courage, and love of family and country shown by these brave pioneer women lives on in mothers today.
It is especially important that we honor mothers today, because we are more aware than ever before of the importance of the family unit, in which mothers play so central a role. Families are truly the foundation of society, and mothers the vital foundation of the life of the family. Their influence on the training and education of our youth is so deep and pervasive that it is impossible to measure.
When we honor mothers, therefore, we honor the women who shape our Nation's future. Their collective effect on the America our children will inherit is greater than that of any act of Congress or any Presidential decision. I am happy, therefore, to have this chance once a year to pay them tribute.
In recognition of the contributions of all mothers to their families and to the Nation, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as Mother's Day and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.
Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 12, 1985, be observed as Mother's Day. I direct government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.
In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-ninth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.
RONALD REAGAN
[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:26 p.m., April 29, 1985]

Ronald Reagan- Mothers Day Proclamation 1986

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation
By tradition, the second Sunday in May is designated as Mother's Day, one of America's best-loved holidays. It gives us all a special occasion to honor our own, and to praise the unique dignity of motherhood one of life's highest callings.
Thomas Jefferson called motherhood "the keystone of the arch of matrimonial happiness," and we must always remember that with love, strength, and fortitude, the American mother assisted in the settlement, development, and prosperity of our country. Her contributions to the well-being of the family, the community, and the Nation are beyond all reckoning. A Jewish saying sums it up: "God could not be everywhere-so He created mothers."
The role of the mother has changed constantly in our society, but its fundamental meaning abides: love and caring. The modern mother is conquering new worlds. She continues to be the heart of the family and the hearth of the home. Where mothers are honored and loved, the family is strong. And where the family is strong the nation is strong.
In recognition of the magnificent contributions of mothers to their families and to the Nation, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother's Day and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.
Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 11, 1986, be observed as Mother's Day. I urge all Americans to express their love and honor to their mothers and to reflect on the importance of motherhood to the well-being of our country. I direct Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.
In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.
RONALD REAGAN
[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 2:42 p.m., April 22, 1986]

Ronald Reagan- Mothers Day Proclamation 1987

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation
For more than 70 years, we Americans have set aside the second Sunday in May to honor our mothers and tell them of our love. No matter how often we express these tributes of the heart throughout the year, we choose to do so in a special way on Mother's Day.
That is because we know and can never forget all that our mothers have given us every day, year by year, in love and courage, in toil and sacrifice, in prayer and example, in faith and forgiveness. There is no love like a mother's-she who carries the child that God knits in the womb, she who nourishes and guides, she who teaches and inspires, she who gives of her heart and soul and self for the good and the happiness of her children and her family.
As mothers help give their families a stability rooted in love, steadfastness, devotion, and morality, they strengthen our communities and our Nation at the same time. Mother's Day is a wonderful time for each of us to give thanks for America's mothers and for all they mean and have meant to our country and our history. It is also a time to thank our own mothers; and whether we may do this in person still, or by loving memory, let us do it with all the love and thanks and prayer we possess.
In recognition of the contributions of mothers to their families and to our Nation, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as Mother's Day and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.
Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 10, 1987, be observed as Mother's Day. I urge all Americans to express their love and respect for their mothers and to reflect on the importance of motherhood to the well-being of our country. I direct government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.
In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-eighth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-seven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eleventh.
RONALD REAGAN
[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:44 a.m., April 29, 1987]

Ronald Reagan- Mothers Day Proclamation 1988

By the President of the United States
of America
A Proclamation
Maternal love is the first tangible bond any human being knows. It is a tie at once physical, emotional, psychological, and mystical. With all of the words that have been written about motherhood, all of the poems of tribute and gratitude that have been penned through the ages, all of the portraits of a mother and child that have been painted down the centuries, none has come close to expressing in full the thankfulness and joy owing to mothers.
The mark of motherhood, as the story of Solomon and the disputed infant in the first Book of Kings shows, is a devotion to the well-being of the child so total that it overlooks itself and its own preferences and needs. It is a love that risks all, bears all, braves all. As it heals and strengthens and inspires in its objects an understanding of self-sacrifice and devotion, it is the parent of many another love as well.
The arms of a mother are the newborn's first cradle and the injured child's first refuge. The hands of a mother are the hands of care for the child who is near and of prayer for the one who is far away. The eyes of a mother are the eyes of fond surprise at baby's first step, the eyes of unspoken worry at the young adult's first voyage from home, the eyes of gladness at every call or visit that says she is honored and remembered. The heart of a mother is a heart that is always full.
Generation after generation has measured love by the work and wonder of motherhood. For these gifts, ever ancient and ever new, we cannot pause too often to give thanks to mothers. As inadequate as our homage may be and as short as a single day is to express it-"What possible comparison was there," a great saint wrote of his mother, "between the honor I showed her and the service she had rendered me?"-Mother's Day affords us an opportunity to meet one of life's happiest duties.
In recognition of the contributions of mothers to their families and to our Nation, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as Mother's Day and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.
Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 8, 1988, be observed as Mother's Day. I urge all Americans to express their love and respect for their mothers and to reflect on the importance of motherhood to the well-being of our country. I direct government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.
In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-sixth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-eight, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twelfth.
RONALD REAGAN
[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 2:34 p.m., April 27, 1988]

 

 

Mothers Who Know

Julie B Beck

By Julie B. Beck, Former General President, LDS Relief Society
October 2007

In the Book of Mormon we read about 2,000 exemplary young men who were exceedingly valiant, courageous, and strong. “Yea, they were men of truth and soberness, for they had been taught to keep the commandments of God and to walk uprightly before him” (Alma 53:21). These faithful young men paid tribute to their mothers. They said, “Our mothers knew it” (Alma 56:48). I would suspect that the mothers of Captain Moroni, Mosiah, Mormon, and other great leaders also knew.

The responsibility mothers have today has never required more vigilance. More than at any time in the history of the world, we need mothers who know. Children are being born into a world where they “wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places” (Ephesians 6:12).1 However, mothers need not fear. When mothers know who they are and who God is and have made covenants with Him, they will have great power and influence for good on their children.

Mothers Who Know Bear Children

Mothers who know desire to bear children. Whereas in many cultures in the world children are “becoming less valued,”2 in the culture of the gospel we still believe in having children. Prophets, seers, and revelators who were sustained at this conference have declared that “God’s commandment for His children to multiply and replenish the earth remains in force.”3 President Ezra Taft Benson taught that young couples should not postpone having children and that “in the eternal perspective, children—not possessions, not position, not prestige—are our greatest jewels.”4

Faithful daughters of God desire children. In the scriptures we read of Eve (see Moses 4:26), Sarah (see Genesis 17:16), Rebekah (see Genesis 24:60), and Mary (see 1 Nephi 11:13–20), who were foreordained to be mothers before children were born to them. Some women are not given the responsibility of bearing children in mortality, but just as Hannah of the Old Testament prayed fervently for her child (see 1 Samuel 1:11), the value women place on motherhood in this life and the attributes of motherhood they attain here will rise with them in the Resurrection (see D&C 130:18). Women who desire and work toward that blessing in this life are promised they will receive it for all eternity, and eternity is much, much longer than mortality. There is eternal influence and power in motherhood.

Mothers Who Know Honor Sacred Ordinances and Covenants

Mothers who know honor sacred ordinances and covenants. I have visited sacrament meetings in some of the poorest places on the earth where mothers have dressed with great care in their Sunday best despite walking for miles on dusty streets and using worn-out public transportation. They bring daughters in clean and ironed dresses with hair brushed to perfection; their sons wear white shirts and ties and have missionary haircuts. These mothers know they are going to sacrament meeting, where covenants are renewed. These mothers have made and honor temple covenants. They know that if they are not pointing their children to the temple, they are not pointing them toward desired eternal goals. These mothers have influence and power.

Mothers Who Know Are Nurturers

Mothers who know are nurturers. This is their special assignment and role under the plan of happiness.5 To nurture means to cultivate, care for, and make grow. Therefore, mothers who know create a climate for spiritual and temporal growth in their homes. Another word for nurturing is homemaking. Homemaking includes cooking, washing clothes and dishes, and keeping an orderly home. Home is where women have the most power and influence; therefore, Latter-day Saint women should be the best homemakers in the world. Working beside children in homemaking tasks creates opportunities to teach and model qualities children should emulate. Nurturing mothers are knowledgeable, but all the education women attain will avail them nothing if they do not have the skill to make a home that creates a climate for spiritual growth. Growth happens best in a “house of order,” and women should pattern their homes after the Lord’s house (see D&C 109). Nurturing requires organization, patience, love, and work. Helping growth occur through nurturing is truly a powerful and influential role bestowed on women.

Mothers Who Know Are Leaders

Mothers who know are leaders. In equal partnership with their husbands, they lead a great and eternal organization. These mothers plan for the future of their organization. They plan for missions, temple marriages, and education. They plan for prayer, scripture study, and family home evening. Mothers who know build children into future leaders and are the primary examples of what leaders look like. They do not abandon their plan by succumbing to social pressure and worldly models of parenting. These wise mothers who know are selective about their own activities and involvement to conserve their limited strength in order to maximize their influence where it matters most.

Mothers Who Know Are Teachers

Mothers who know are always teachers. Since they are not babysitters, they are never off duty. A well-taught friend told me that he did not learn anything at church that he had not already learned at home. His parents used family scripture study, prayer, family home evening, mealtimes, and other gatherings to teach. Think of the power of our future missionary force if mothers considered their homes as a pre–missionary training center. Then the doctrines of the gospel taught in the MTC would be a review and not a revelation. That is influence; that is power.

Mothers Who Know Do Less

Mothers who know do less. They permit less of what will not bear good fruit eternally. They allow less media in their homes, less distraction, less activity that draws their children away from their home. Mothers who know are willing to live on less and consume less of the world’s goods in order to spend more time with their children—more time eating together, more time working together, more time reading together, more time talking, laughing, singing, and exemplifying. These mothers choose carefully and do not try to choose it all. Their goal is to prepare a rising generation of children who will take the gospel of Jesus Christ into the entire world. Their goal is to prepare future fathers and mothers who will be builders of the Lord’s kingdom for the next 50 years. That is influence; that is power.

Mothers Who Know Stand Strong and Immovable

Who will prepare this righteous generation of sons and daughters? Latter-day Saint women will do this—women who know and love the Lord and bear testimony of Him, women who are strong and immovable and who do not give up during difficult and discouraging times. We are led by an inspired prophet of God who has called upon the women of the Church to “stand strong and immovable for that which is correct and proper under the plan of the Lord.”6 He has asked us to “begin in [our] own homes”7 to teach children the ways of truth. Latter-day Saint women should be the very best in the world at upholding, nurturing, and protecting families. I have every confidence that our women will do this and will come to be known as mothers who “knew” (Alma 56:48). In the name of Jesus Christ, amen.

 1. See Gordon B. Hinckley, “Standing Strong and Immovable,” Worldwide Leadership Training Meeting, Jan. 10, 2004, 21.   2. James E. Faust, “Challenges Facing the Family,” Worldwide Leadership Training Meeting, Jan. 10, 2004, 2.   3. “The Family: A Proclamation to the World,” Liahona, Oct. 2004, 49; Ensign, Nov. 1995, 102.   4. To the Mothers in Zion (pamphlet, 1987), 3.   5. See “The Family: A Proclamation to the World.”   6. Gordon B. Hinckley, Worldwide Leadership Training Meeting, Jan. 10, 2004, 20.   7. Gordon B. Hinckley, Worldwide Leadership Training Meeting, Jan. 10, 2004, 20.